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Talks

  1. Organization, historicity and causality


    Two models dominate reflection on causality, namely mechanisms and physics. The former focuses on very local processes, while the latter focuses on ahistorical systems. We argue that neither is a sufficient framework for biology. Instead, in biology, parts of a system collectively maintain each other…

  2. Disruption et combinatoire en biologie


    Les désorganisations du vivant, dues aussi bien au changement climatique qu'aux pollutions chimiques (par les perturbateurs endocriniens), sont souvent décrites en termes de disruption. Pourtant, en biologie, la notion de disruption n'a pas encore été théorisée. Nous pensons que conceptualiser ces …

  3. Theorizing biological disruptions: the case of endocrine disruptors


    The notion of disruption is used broadly in the scientific literature to describe anthropogenic, detrimental effects on living beings, from organisms to ecosystems. However, this notion is missing a proper theoretical and conceptual elaboration. Why do living beings display specific vulnerabilities…

  4. Intermittence, rythmes et anti-entropie dans le vivant


    Le vivant comporte bon nombre de rythmes, des rythmes ayant une origine externe, comme les rythmes circadiens ou circannuels, et des rythmes internes comme les cycles cardiaques ou respiratoires. Quel est le lien entre ces rythmes, le maintien des organisations biologiques face à la croissance tendancielle…

  5. Historical origins and the theoretical definition of objects in biology


    In the structure of the main theories of physics, origins play a limited role. For example, the Noether theorem, the fundamental theorem to understand the connection between conservative quantities (for example, energy) and symmetries (for example, time translations), requires a starting point, but…

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